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Aldo's seafood salad recipe

Aldo's seafood salad recipe


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  • Recipes
  • Dish type
  • Salad
  • Seafood salad
  • Prawn salad

This is the queen of seafood salads. Delicious as a light starter or summer salad.

Be the first to make this!

IngredientsServes: 4

  • 500g clams
  • 500g mussels
  • drizzle of olive oil
  • 1 clove of garlic, chopped
  • 1 lemon, quartered
  • 1 stick celery, halved
  • 1kg octopus
  • 200g squid
  • 200g prawns
  • 1 carrot
  • 1 handful chopped fresh parsley
  • 2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  • 1 pinch salt

MethodPrep:15min ›Cook:50min ›Ready in:1hr5min

  1. In a large frying pan, cook clams and mussels in 2cm of water until they open up. Keep open clams and mussels and discard any that have remained closed.
  2. Add a drizzle of oil and chopped garlic. Cook for 4 to 5 minutes. Remove the pan from the heat. Remove shells from the clams and mussels.
  3. Bring a large pot of lightly salted water to the boil with 3/4 of lemon, 1/2 of the celery, 1/2 of the parsley and the octopus. Lower heat and simmer for 40 minutes.
  4. Remove the octopus and add the squid to the same water. Simmer for 10 minutes. Remove the squid and add the prawns. Cook for 5 to 10 minutes, until opaque.
  5. Slice the octopus into cubes and the squids into rings.
  6. Chop the carrot and the remaining celery and boil them for 3 minutes in lightly salted water.
  7. In a small bowl, mix the parsley, the oil and the salt.
  8. Mix the vegetables with all the seafood and season with the mixture of oil, parsley and salt. Serve warm or cold with the remaining lemon wedge.

Tip

Wash all seafood thoroughly before cooking.

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Reviews & ratingsAverage global rating:(1)


Shrimp and Vegetable Couscous Salad

This Shrimp and Vegetable Couscous Salad can serve as a light and healthy meal or a hearty side. It is a great alternative to pasta salad!

I am going to let you in on a little secret. I am almost 6 months pregnant! Aldo and I are super excited about having our first baby, even though neither of us has any idea of how to take care of babies. Aldo's been doing lots of reading - yes, he's the one reading all the pregnancy and baby books! And I've been doing LOTS OF EATING.

I did not think it was possible for someone who does so little physical activity to be SO HUNGRY ALL THE TIME. It's insane how quickly our full fridge turns empty, and how much more expensive our grocery receipts are because I need snacks all day (and sometimes at night!).

Because of this whole eating-for-two thing I've been trying to cook recipes that will give me plenty of leftovers, and ones that are healthy, filling, and easy to make.

This Shrimp & Vegetable Couscous Salad has been in rotation a few times because of all those reasons, and because I can pull it out of the fridge and just eat it cold when I need a snack since it doesn't need to be served warm.

This also makes it a great salad to take to work for lunch because it doesn't need to be reheated.


RECIPE REQUEST:

Over the years, the Block Island Times has contained many references to the pepperoni bread served at Aldo’s Restaurant. In letters and columns, island residents have written that they buy it up in the fall to freeze for a taste of summer in midwinter that they can’t find any as good on the mainland and that it’s an essential part of the Block Island eating experience, right up there with steamed lobsters, Beachead chili, Club Soda ribs and the salad bar at the Harborside.

Ron Tierney of Corn Neck Road loves Aldo’s pepperoni bread so much that his wife, Judy, asked Recipe Request to find out how it’s made, perhaps hoping to make it for him at home. That plan may not succeed — Ron says he knows perfectly well how to get it, “Just order it from Aldo’s” — but for all the other readers who may have wondered what goes into this delicious appetizer, here’s the story from Aldo’s Restaurant owner Steven Papa, who generously agreed to share the secrets of his simple but delicious recipe — or at least, most of them.

“I came across it while cooking at a restaurant in Florida,” says Papa, “and then I revised it” into the dish that’s now been served at Aldo’s for 15 years and remains one of the restaurant’s most popular appetizers. He liked it, he says, because “it has a distinct flavor, and it’s like a pepperoni pizza all rolled up into something you can walk around with and carry in your hand.”

Much depends, Papa says, on the quality of the dough and pepperoni. At the restaurant, he’s supplied with fresh dough made next door at the bakery every morning. For those not so lucky, store-bought fresh dough will work perfectly well.

He also recommends using deli pepperoni, roughly four inches in diameter, rather than the narrower stick pepperoni. After years of trying different brands, he’s hit upon the one with the tastiest and most consistent product, but he’s not telling which one it is. There’s a good brand of deli pepperoni at the Block Island Grocery, though, he says.

As for the red sauce for dipping, he said with a smile that Aldo’s can’t give up its signature recipe, but any tomato-based spaghetti sauce that readers like will do fine.

Papa handed over the "rolling" of the pepperoni bread to Rafael Paz three years ago. Originally from Guatemala, Paz has been at Aldo’s for eight years, working his way up from dishwasher. He makes racks of the bread every morning, working fast and surely, with lots of flour on his wooden work surface to keep the dough easy to handle and a little help from a Univex dough roller.

[Full disclosure: With typical generosity, Papa sent this reporter back to the office with two large loaves of pepperoni bread. Incredibly, it all disappeared within an hour, even tempting our mostly vegetarian resident health nut, despite the fact that it was well before lunchtime and everyone had already had breakfast. It’s quite a testament to the dish — as well, of course, to our staff's greediness. Thanks, Aldo’s. We enjoyed every bite!]

Steven Papa’s pepperoni bread, from Aldo’s Restaurant

6 oz. sliced deli pepperoni

6 oz. shredded mozzarella cheese

Roll out dough into a rectangular sheet. It should be about 18 inches on the longer edge, or whatever will fit on your biggest baking sheet. Lay pepperoni in two overlapping rows long-ways down the center of the rectangle. Cover generously with cheese. Brush the seasoned herb butter down one edge of the dough, parallel with the pepperoni.

To form the bread, grasp the non-buttered edge of the dough and fold it up and over the cheese. Then roll the stuffed dough over so that it lies on top of the buttered edge, forming a seal between the two layers of dough, sort of like rolling up a huge burrito.

Transfer to a baking sheet and score a row of slits into the top with a knife. It’s not necessary to cut all the way through the dough across the whole width, as long as there’s a small tear so that steam can escape. Otherwise your pepperoni bread “will explode,” warns Papa.

Bake at 400¡ to 450¡ Fahrenheit for 15 to 20 minutes, depending on how well-done you like it. Serve cut into narrow slices with red sauce for dipping.


Never mind the Santa Cruz wharf. Aldo's at the Yacht Harbor (long)

Well, hubby and I went on a seafood binge yesterday and are trying to get those cholesterol levels back to equilibrium. Of course, I had to hold him back from the fresh oysters at the Aptos farmer's market this AM--geesh.

As I'm sure has often been discussed on this and other coastal boards, wharf food can generally be overpriced and underwhelming, catering to the famished and uninformed tourist. I was one of those fools when I first moved to Santa Cruz, having had a lackluster meal at Stagnaro's on the wharf. But I knew that good seafood was awaiting elsewhere.

Yesterday was a gorgeous fall day in SC, and hubby and I were able to stop for lunch at the Yacht Harbor, east of the wharf/boardwalk area. My main goal was to pick up 2 live dungeness crabs from a crabbing boat ($4/lb.), but hey, I'd been wanting to try Aldo's in that area and it just so happened to be lunchtime.

Aldo's is perched at the very southern tip of the west harbor, offering diners a clear and tranquil view of the Monterey Bay. My friends, everything about this place screams non-contrived nautical--the docked boats, sea gulls, dark wood furnishings, navy blue and white walls, exterior paint weathered by salty ocean air. Although the outside looks shabby from the webphoto, it is actually very clean and comfy while the inside is dressed up a bit. Even though we chose to stay warm by sitting inside, the sun streamed in through large windows, which framed the view like a Hopper painting.

They only serve breakfast and lunch, and in typical mom-and-pop fashion they open until "closing," which on Fri. happened to be "around 3." Lunch menu is tailored to chowder, fried seafood baskets, classic seafood salads, and the usual drinks (although they did have a few basic wines by the glass). I'm sure the menu changes daily depending on what's available, so the webmenu is different from what we were given that day.

Hubby ordered the fried oysters w/ fries ($7.95) and I ordered the fried calamari w/ chowder ($7.95 + $1 xtra for the chowder). We didn't bother getting the other side option: a salad. The chowder was cream-based and had mostly clams w/ a few celery pieces and new potatoes floating around. The flavor was smokey and deep, and the clams were weepingly tender. Consistency of the chowder was on the runny side for my taste, but the flavor dwarfed that complaint quickly.

Food came out relatively fast given that they were apparently busy. Oysters were the size of golf balls. Calamari had a nice textural mix of flat pieces and tentacles. At first, they didn't look as coated or as crisp as I like however, upon tasting, they were both so achingly fresh and flavorful that we actually agreed that the light-frying allowed them to shine. Not sure if that was intentional, but the fries were noticeably more crispy. Also worth a mention is the tartar sauce--it was smooth, tangy, and sweet. 2 platters w/ sides and 2 iced teas = $20 before tax & tip. Servers looked like UCSC students, and they were very efficient, friendly, and helpful.

Well, we will be back very soon for their breakfast. I can't picture a more perfect morning: fugasa french toast or seafood omelette, coffee, paper, and that view. This seems to be where the locals go, and for dining at dinnertime, the Crow's Nest on the east end may fit the bill. BTW, we did get that crab and it was melt-in-your-mouth heaven.


Zucchini Trifolati


It is that time of year again when I start to get emails from folks asking for help using up their abundant zucchini harvest. Although I will not have a vegetable garden at my new house until next year since they are still working on the landscaping, I remember too well what it is like to be picking baskets full of zucchini on a daily basis. This zucchini dish is one that you will see across Italy as it is a simple method for cooking zucchini to enjoy as a side dish. Trifolati is basically just a method of preparing vegetables with garlic, olive oil, and parsley until they are soft and thoroughly cooked. I like to use mint in place of the parsley and add a pinch of red chili flakes as well.

I serve this side dish all summer long, and for variation, I will add in some cherry tomatoes just before the zucchini is thoroughly cooked. As well as serving this dish as a veggie side dish with grilled or roasted meat, I also like to serve it on an antipasti tray along with some prosciutto, or good quality salami along and slices of crusty Italian bread. Small, freshly picked zucchini are best in this dish as large zucchini can contain too much water. I prefer this dish at room temperature so you can enjoy the subtle flavor of the zucchini, but it can be served warm as well.


Never mind the Santa Cruz wharf. Aldo's at the Yacht Harbor (long)

Well, hubby and I went on a seafood binge yesterday and are trying to get those cholesterol levels back to equilibrium. Of course, I had to hold him back from the fresh oysters at the Aptos farmer's market this AM--geesh.

As I'm sure has often been discussed on this and other coastal boards, wharf food can generally be overpriced and underwhelming, catering to the famished and uninformed tourist. I was one of those fools when I first moved to Santa Cruz, having had a lackluster meal at Stagnaro's on the wharf. But I knew that good seafood was awaiting elsewhere.

Yesterday was a gorgeous fall day in SC, and hubby and I were able to stop for lunch at the Yacht Harbor, east of the wharf/boardwalk area. My main goal was to pick up 2 live dungeness crabs from a crabbing boat ($4/lb.), but hey, I'd been wanting to try Aldo's in that area and it just so happened to be lunchtime.

Aldo's is perched at the very southern tip of the west harbor, offering diners a clear and tranquil view of the Monterey Bay. My friends, everything about this place screams non-contrived nautical--the docked boats, sea gulls, dark wood furnishings, navy blue and white walls, exterior paint weathered by salty ocean air. Although the outside looks shabby from the webphoto, it is actually very clean and comfy while the inside is dressed up a bit. Even though we chose to stay warm by sitting inside, the sun streamed in through large windows, which framed the view like a Hopper painting.

They only serve breakfast and lunch, and in typical mom-and-pop fashion they open until "closing," which on Fri. happened to be "around 3." Lunch menu is tailored to chowder, fried seafood baskets, classic seafood salads, and the usual drinks (although they did have a few basic wines by the glass). I'm sure the menu changes daily depending on what's available, so the webmenu is different from what we were given that day.

Hubby ordered the fried oysters w/ fries ($7.95) and I ordered the fried calamari w/ chowder ($7.95 + $1 xtra for the chowder). We didn't bother getting the other side option: a salad. The chowder was cream-based and had mostly clams w/ a few celery pieces and new potatoes floating around. The flavor was smokey and deep, and the clams were weepingly tender. Consistency of the chowder was on the runny side for my taste, but the flavor dwarfed that complaint quickly.

Food came out relatively fast given that they were apparently busy. Oysters were the size of golf balls. Calamari had a nice textural mix of flat pieces and tentacles. At first, they didn't look as coated or as crisp as I like however, upon tasting, they were both so achingly fresh and flavorful that we actually agreed that the light-frying allowed them to shine. Not sure if that was intentional, but the fries were noticeably more crispy. Also worth a mention is the tartar sauce--it was smooth, tangy, and sweet. 2 platters w/ sides and 2 iced teas = $20 before tax & tip. Servers looked like UCSC students, and they were very efficient, friendly, and helpful.

Well, we will be back very soon for their breakfast. I can't picture a more perfect morning: fugasa french toast or seafood omelette, coffee, paper, and that view. This seems to be where the locals go, and for dining at dinnertime, the Crow's Nest on the east end may fit the bill. BTW, we did get that crab and it was melt-in-your-mouth heaven.


See Also

Around the time I was age 15, I became real interested in cookbooks, cooking magazines and would prefer reading about cooking and how to prepare food then I did reading novels or watching movies. By the time I was married at age 22, I had purchased several cookbooks from book clubs, bookstores, etc. I never could part with any of my cookbooks after I took possession of them. I was given several from various family members and friends along the way and from there my collection grew and grew and grew and is still growing. Sometime in the mid-1980's I really became interested in collecting and preserving older recipes. I started visiting estate and garages sales and was amazed at how many people were willing to sell off family recipe collections and cookbooks. I have been known to walk into an estate sale, ask what they want for all the cookbooks and recipes in the estate and been told $20.00. Wow, when I walk away with 100 or more cookbooks (many very old) and a collection of somebody's handwritten recipe, I just don't understand how somebody can walk away from that history.


6 ounces fettuccine pasta
1 tablespoon olive oil
4 ounces raw lobster meat
1/4 cup finely diced red onion
1/4 cup finely diced red and green bell pepper
2 ounces white wine
1 tablespoon minced garlic
1 tablespoon julienne-cut fresh basil
8 ounces heavy cream
1/4 cup shredded Asiago or Parmesan cheese
additional Asiago or Parmesan cheese for garnish
minced fresh parsley or green onions for garnish

Cook the fettuccine as directed on the package. Drain well and set aside.

Heat the olive oil in a 10-inch skillet over medium heat. Add the lobster meat, red onion, and bell pepper and cook, stirring constantly, for 2-3 minutes. Remove from the skillet with a slotted spoon and set aside.

Add the wine, garlic, basil, and cream to the skillet. Increase the temperature to medium-high heat and bring to a strong simmer. Let the mixture cook, stirring constantly, until the sauce begins to thicken.

Stir the cheese and return the lobster and vegetables to the pan. Cook, stirring occasionally, for 2-3 minutes or until the cheese is melted and the lobster is heated through.

Toss with the fettuccine. Serve immediately topped with additional shredded cheese and minced parsley or green onions, if desired.


Recipe Summary

  • 1 (16 ounce) package farfalle pasta
  • 1 bunch fresh cilantro
  • 5 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 tablespoon white wine vinegar
  • ¼ cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • ½ teaspoon cayenne pepper
  • ½ cup walnuts or pecans
  • salt to taste
  • ½ cup olive oil

Bring a large pot of salted water to a boil. Add the pasta, and return water to a boil. Cook pasta for 8 to 10 minutes, or until al dente drain well.

In an electric food processor or blender, blend cilantro, garlic, vinegar, Parmesan cheese, cayenne pepper, nuts, and salt. Add 1/4 cup of the olive oil, and blend the pesto. Add more olive oil until the pesto reaches your desired consistency.

Pour pesto in a small saucepan and warm over low heat, stirring constantly, until pesto begins to simmer. Pour over cooked pasta and toss.


Fried shrimp at Steinhilber's is a beach iconic eat

When Robert Steinhilber first opened his namesake restaurant in 1939, he may not have imagined generations of folks dining here almost 80 years later.

But indeed, tucked away the Virginia Beach neighborhood of Thalia, Steinhilber's is still in the family, run by his daughter Jeanne Steinhilber and grandson Brady Viccellio.

The restaurant today, a large, low-lying, rambling building (formerly a golf course clubhouse) located in front of an expansive, manicured lawn leading down to the western branch of the Lynnhaven River, is one of the region's oldest, continually operated eateries.

It's also home to one of Virginia Beach's most iconic eats.

On the menu, the dish is simply titled The Original Jumbo Fantail Fried Shrimp. And indeed, it's a simple dish. Executive Chef Paul Syms takes extra large shrimp, removes the shell just leaving the tail, de-veins them, and slices them from the head about halfway down in a butterfly cut. They are lightly battered and quickly fried until golden brown.

Viccellio tells me that the shrimp are U-12, a grading which means that there are fewer than 12 shrimp to the pound, translating that these are indeed the big boys. The dish, available as an appetizer or as an entree, is served atop a flourish of greens and with a signature pink remoulade-style sauce.

A shrimp dish, although not this one, was most likely on the first Steinhilber's menu, augmenting the other seafood offerings and steaks. Viccellio says this version first appeared in the 1940s, meaning that for some seven decades it has delighted generations of diners.

Note: This is part of an occasional look at iconic eats and drinks offered at restaurants across Virginia Beach. They may have been on menus a number of years, epitomized the region's foods and foodways, or be wildly popular. If you have an iconic eat or drink for me to check out, email me at [email protected]

Steinhilber's is at 653 Thalia Rd. Call 757-340-1156 or visit www.Steinys.com.

NEW THREE COURSE MENU SERVED UP AT SONOMA

On the heels of renovations and menu changes, Sonoma Town Center's Executive Chef Mackenzie Hess has released a new three-course bill of fare.

"We had made a few menu changes and wanted to highlight some of those items," says Hess. The offerings include an appetizer, entree and dessert priced at $40, or $55 if you include wine pairings.

Among the first plate options are soup, salad, or Tuna Tartare Tostada.

"The tuna tostada is delicious," Hess notes. "Ahi tuna is tossed in Mexican spice with avocado, and house pico de Gallo and is served on baked tortilla crisps and cilantro crema."

Plate-two selections showcase a four-ounce (or eight-ounce, for an additional charge) filet with seared shrimp, a smoked chicken thigh, or Shrimp & Scallop Risotto. Another choice is the Atlantic Salmon.

"The grilled Atlantic Salmon is another new addition to the menu," says Hess. "It comes with pan-seared gnocchi, leeks and shiitake mushrooms tossed in a Parmesan soubise."

Two dessert options round out the meal deal: Chocolate Cake with Raspberry Coulis and Chantilly Cream, or seasonal cheesecake.


Watch the video: Σαλάτα με θαλασσινά


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